Aug 072012
 

I am surprised how little rumours are about the iPod Nano while all is about iPhone 5 and iPad Mini.

iPhone 5
Wider screen, smaller dock connector, smaller SIM card, high-speed LTE. Nothing revolutionary, right?

iPad Mini
Oh yes, it is a smaller version of the iPad. Probably with the iPad 2 screen resolution and a more appealing price tag. Nice but not exciting.

iPod Touch
Better speed, larger screen. good, but .. well.

So what about the iPod Nano?

I reckon that Apple will announce a “revolutionary”“magic”“beautiful” new iPod Nano in September. I have no insider knowledge whatsoever. This is just me reflecting on what I consider another lucrative market ready to harvest. Here is my reasoning

  • Design: Watch
    The form factor of the iPod Nano makes it a very lucrative wearable device – like a watch (wristband) or brooch (clip). The success ofTikTok and Lunatik wristbands, the Pebble watch and the I’m Watch gadget is enough proof.
    “Apple is fixing the Pebble watch’s biggest flaw?” How generous! Apple is rather providing this capability for their own watch!
  • Technology: Bluetooth 4.0
    The lower power consumption of Bluetooth 4.0 leads to new wearable gadgets collecting personal data and transmitting it to a hub device without much recharging.
    The scenarios and sensors already exist: heart rate, pulse, blood flow, temperature, sleep patterns, steps, scales ..
    It will be interesting to see which display technology Apple will pick. E-Ink? Pixel Qi?
  • Strategy: Platform
    A personal hub that collects and displays data from the various sensors in a secure, ‘standardized’ way provides a perfect platform strategy. This nicely complements the larger iTunes and App Store platform on the lower end.In June Apple announced partnership with major automobile companies for the “Siri-enabled Eyes Free” car integration. I expect another partnership announcement around the iPod Nano and sensors. My candidates: Polar, Nike, some players in the health sector and some innovative companies such as Withings.
  • Money: New market, high profit margin
    I expect they can drop the base price for the iPod Nano below $100 (even $80?) including clip and still make significant profit. They can earn more money with a smart wristband copying the approach of the iPad Smart Cover.

Again, all of this is pure speculation. It just seems very compelling to me.

So what do you think?

[Originally posted on Google+]

Jul 212012
 

Reflecting on the Why the mini-tablet is the children’s toy of the year post from Mike Elgan.

We consciously limit the use of gadgets while our daughter is around. Nevertheless there are exceptions: browse photos, watch Peppa Pig when on vacation or when she is sick, and skype Grandma.

Today she asked to have her own iPhone?! What does she need it for? Quote: “Skype Grandma.”

The intuitive touch interface and engaging apps attract the child in us – and, of course, in our kids. And I agree with +Mike Elgan  that form factor and price of 7″ mini-tablets are good fit for children’s toy of the year.

Though did you know there is already a (very) mini-iPad available? It is called iPod Touch. So if mini-tablets really dominate holiday gift sales, Apple should be able to leverage a fair share for an adjacent cheaper iPod Touch.

Oh, and my current iPod Touch 4G will become my daughter’s first ‘iPhone’. Yes, it does skype!

Originally posted on Google+.

Aug 052011
 

Unlearning is hard. I noticed it myself when I upgraded (clean install, ahem) to Lion over the last weekend. I used the whole weekend my Mac Mini with Lion and no other computer. It took these 2-3 days to get used to the “natural” scrolling in Lion.

The strange thing happened on Monday: When I scrolled on my work computer (with Windows using scroll wheel), I really felt that the text moved in the ‘wrong’ direction – unnaturally.

Browse through Apple discussion fora and you will see people complaining that “Scroll goes the wrong way in Lion” and how to ‘fix’ it.

Why does Apple consider it ‘natural’, when it is the opposite of how it is done in all graphical user interfaces so far – including Mac OS X? They must be wrong, right?

First of all, plenty user interfaces nowadays provide scrolling exactly this way. You do it all the time when you use an iPod, iPhone, iPad, Android and – I guess – other smart phones. And that felt naturally, right? And you did not get confused with what you do on your phone and on your computer, because it was a different context.

These touch interfaces have been leveraged to make more ‘natural user interfaces‘ – as some boldly call it. Some might claim the breakthrough started with the multi-touch interface a guy in black shirt and jeans presented on-stage in 2006.

But why do GUIs use the other direction in the first place? Well, originally you did not move the content itself up, but you moved the ‘bar’ (or thumb) in the scrollbar down. Originally, graphical user interfaces were limited to what you can do with point, click and drag using a traditional computer mouse. Particular GUI objects, such as scrollbars, are used to allow specific user actions.

However, the scrollbar has been no longer essential to provide the user action since the introduction of the scroll wheel. Apple has continued this by making multi-touch devices ubiquitous with their computers with Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad.in addition to the multi-touch pad in their MacBook notebooks.

Apple’s “Back to the Mac” push with Lion evolves the OS X user interface away from a traditional GUI. The switch of the scroll direction makes it consistent with iOS, more intuitive for complete novices and permits to completely remove the scrollbar as an actionable object.

So don’t simply fix the ‘wrong’ scroll direction in Lion. Rather unlearn an outdated concept and I am sure you will find the new way completely intuitive after a few days. Enjoy!